Category: Weight Gain

Restaurant Review: The Hummus House Vegan/Vegetarian Restaurant in Ft. Lauderdale

The Hummus House Vegan/Vegetarian Restaurant

Menu

I recently got a gift certificate for my birthday for this quaint restaurant in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. (900 NE 20th Ave., Fort Lauderdale, FL 33304)

When my husband and I arrived, the first impasse was that there was no free parking. In my estimation I always have to factor in time and cost as I make my choice for a restaurant. I enjoy having a parking place within walking distance to the place, especially on a hot day. However, this was not the case.

…but in the end, I thought it was delicious!

The short jaunt was well worth it, though, as the atmosphere is adorable, truly—the furnishings and decor is really typical of the culture, which was traditional Israeli.

As you may notice by the look of this small restaurant below, there is no table service. I was a bit disappointed by that. I like to be served when I eat. I lose the sense of enjoyment, when I have to order and pay for my food up front before I ever taste it. This was my next point of contention. When my husband and I inquired about possible mistakes about veganism on the menu, we were met with a bit of confusion about what a Vegan actually is and what one would eat.

In my estimation, if you are going to open a vegan/vegetarian restaurant, you really need to know the culture of it and the parameters of each. For instance, they had baklava as a vegan dessert. Of course, I believed them, because I thought, why would they go to the trouble of specifying each item as vegan or vegetarian if they didn’t know the difference? Maybe they used agave instead of honey (I was hoping). However, as my husband and I have realized over the years, we must, must MUST ASK EVERY TIME!

This particular time, we were met with a sullen face, “A lot of vegans say it is okay to eat honey!” Of course, he was met with my quizzical glare.

“Okay,” I responded, “What else on the menu can we find that does not have eggs, honey, milk products of any kind, and that is also completely plant-based?” (The manager of the restaurant didn’t even know if the pita bread was vegan.)

Beyond all of this, I was overcharged, I was served the wrong dish, but in the end, I thought it was delicious! So, what do you say to this? The owner came out to do damage control, which was great and well-needed, as the manager decided to take a job interviewee while we were eating. I want this place to survive, but I would love for them to make the necessary changes to make this a great place, not just an “okay” place!

The owner was great, offered us a free lemonade drink that he made with special herbs. It was great, but had tons of sugar in it that gave me a buzz that I couldn’t shake till well into the morning hours. I had wished he had been honest about how much sugar he had added. He said, “Just a bit.” He could have easily used a sugar substitute, which again is part of not knowing the culture of vegans. We enjoy healthy food, not sugary-laced food that has white, refined sugar in it.

All in all, this gets a *** stars out of 5.

 

 

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Listening to Your Body and Your Hunger…

When Dieting we consider many concepts, ideas, attitudes about what is important and what isn’t. But how many of us have simply just stopped to listen to our body? I’m not talking about listening to the voice of the brain that chatters on about tempting things we shouldn’t be eating. I want you to consider for a minute that every moment, every second, your body knows exactly what you need to survive. You’re thirsty when you need hydration. You crave certain food when your body needs specific content and vitamins. And, mostly, when you are full, you actually have what’s called an appestat in your brain that tells you when to stop eating. However, we have simply stopped listening to our bodies, because we are mostly eating on the run, living on the run, and never stop.

Make it a practice to eat with no devices turned on. Don’t answer phone calls, watch television, scan the web, or make idle chat while eating. Simply taste each bite. I good extra practice is to chew your food enough times to remember every hand that had to touch your food before it has gotten to your plate and give thanks to each person responsible for the nutrition that you are gleaning from each bite… each morsel.

If we could do just this much, we could probably never have to diet again. I’ve been on this conscious eating plan for a while now and the extra flab is just falling off. I can also see, as I stay conscious of my bad habits sneaking back in, when and where I need to work on making a shift in consciousness about certain food. For instance, today, I wanted a sandwich with protein and decided on a half of a bagel instead of an entire one. The choice was perfect. I didn’t feel heavy and full after I ate. In fact, I was even able to swim a few laps about 30 minutes after dinner.

This evening when I normally would have snacked on something like popcorn or a couple dates with nut butter, instead I ate just a 1/2 of an orange. It was actually enough.

Let’s be satisfied with enough.

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Two Days a Week Can Change Your Heart Health

I took one of my dearest friends for his 50-year colonoscopy. As I waited in the lobby of the hospital, I spent much time wondering if I should have the exam, as well. I considered my recent healthy and unhealthy choices and wondered if I would come out on the side of cancer free.

Unfortunately, my friend did not get so lucky. That day is now firmly adhered to my brain. I could never walk away from the idea that I am the only one who can create health for my own body.

“My choices, my health!” is now my motto.

Even though no one would consider me overweight, my cholesterol tests and heart exams were declining every year. When I had to begin statins to lower my cholesterol, I decided to go back to being a vegetarian or a vegan to see if a diet change would make a difference in my LDL (bad cholesterol). To my surprise, my doctor was more than just onboard, he recommended a vegan diet. In fact, he told me that all of his vegan patients have lowered their LDL with a completely plant-based diet. Most were able to get off of the statins completely.  I went home and began planning for an immediate diet change.

I didn’t want to freak out my body and mind, so I decided I would start a slow plan with a plant-based diet for a couple of days a week. When I cooked the household meals from one of the vegetarian cookbooks I had written in the past, everyone in the house would want to join me in eating. Even my mother, whose sour-puss face hates when people refuse her food for another, actually joined in a few times.  I had actually forgotten how much I enjoyed cooking. Plus, I did not realize how much easier vegetable-based food was to digest.

What older adults do not realize until too late is that meat becomes more and more difficult to digest as adults get older.

Red meat can spend up to 3 days in the colon. It rots there as a mucous covers it, while the body waits to digest it. However, if you continue to eat the same amount of animal protein every day, then your body never has time to remove those pockets of undigested meat from the colon. These particulates turn into hard black matter and ultimately cause problems in the colon. Personally, I feel this is the beginning of all colon disease.

After about a month of eating plant-based for 2-3 days a week, I moved up to 5 days a week being a pseudo-vegan, which left me 2 days a week with just one portion of meat or fish each day. By the end of two months, no one could force me to go back to being a 7-day-a-week carnivore.

I had lost 9 pounds without even trying.

  1. My stomach was not bloated after eating.
  2. I was having one—if not two—easy bowel movements a day.
  3. Interestingly enough, I felt younger and looked younger.
  4. Even my doctor shared that my LDL went to a very safe number after just two months of changing my diet. I was able to get off of the statin.

 

In the past 1 1/2 years of being a full-fledged vegan, I have written a Vegan Cookbook called Angel Feast. The recipes are simple, easy, and rarely costly—certainly not as expensive as meat, ever. My husband and I spend less the $100 a week on groceries, cooking 95% of our meals at home.

 

 

My cookbook explains:

  • how to make the protein conversion from meat to plant-based protein;
  • suggests a palate of food and spices for your shopping list; and then
  • helps you plan meals that are completely plant-based without every feeling you are missing a thing.

Truly, the only feeling you will miss is feeling nauseous and bloated.

Go to the following link and buy a copy of the Kindle Version of the book and you’ll get a special price this week: ONLY $3.99.

Yes, that’s right! I want the people I love to have this book for as cheap as I could arrange it with the publishers. Download it, even if you don’t think you’ll make the shift for a while. When you get a wake up call to be more heart-healthy, this book will be ready and waiting on your bookshelf.

While my husband, David, is working on constructing the printed version of Angel Feast with the amazing pictures you have been seeing on Facebook and Instagram (the cost will be in the $15 range), you can get this Kindle version with the pictures on a dedicated web page, to keep the cost even lower. Just $3.99 for a lifetime of heart healthy food that you’ll never want to stop eating. I promise.

Happy and Healthy Eating,

Your Friend, Bo

 

 

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